The Tooth Fairy has a difficult decision to make

Standard
English: Artists impression of the tooth fairy...

Artist’s impression of the tooth fairy. (Wikipedia)

It all started with the nighttime prayers when my five-year-old prayed that her bothersome loose tooth would come out soon. It was only a little bit loose, mind you.

Then, at tooth brush time, for the first time in days, she didn’t say, “Be careful of my loose tooth.” She had been saying this at every teeth brushing for the past several days. At the previous brushing, I finally told her, “I know. You don’t have to tell me every time,” with just the slightest bit of irritation.

As you’ve probably already guessed, because she didn’t say it, I forgot about the loose tooth and managed to clock it with the princess electric toothbrush she got from the dentist. Ah, the irony.

It started bleeding and was now very loose. I grabbed a square of toilet paper to wrap around it, and, naturally, the tooth fell out between my fingers. SheΒ  mewed a bit when I showed it to her. “See how quickly God answered your prayer?!” She actually perked at that.

Invisible high-five for me.

Tucked snuggly in her bed, tooth safely stowed under her pillow, the bleeding having stopped, my daughter said, “I wonder how many quarters I’ll get for this tooth. Maybe just one because it’s so tiny. Or maybe a lot because it’s so cute!”

There aren’t enough quarters in the world to match the cuteness of my little girl.

Advertisements

20 responses »

  1. Do you know how much I love this story?Reminds me of my Bethy who is in the Navy now.She would leave those teeth in until they were laying sideways in her mouth.I would always think she was going to swallow one of them but she never did.Seriously give the kid a few exta quarters for her bravery.So cute.

    Like

    • Her older sister is like your daughter. Hers never bled because they would just fall out on their own, no matter how long it took. They would fall out and I wouldn’t even know about it. She’d just say, incidentally, hours later, that it had fallen out, as though I didn’t really need to know. The Tooth Fairy knows. That’s all that matters, I guess! They had immediately been deposited under her pillow, ready for the exchange.

      Like

      • Boys must be different. I noticed my son wasn’t talking about his loose tooth any more. I asked him about it. He shrugged and said it came out a few days ago. Where is it I asked. “Dunno”, he says, “somewhere in the grass”. Another time, “Dunno, I think I swallowed it”. If it comes out at school that’s a different story. The teacher sends him to the nurse who sends his tooth home in a snazzy red, bio-hazard stickered sandwich baggie. ( By the way, I loved putting those stickers on candy bars and leaving them for co-workers with no attached note. Some guy actually pitched the candy! Does no one respect the Three Muskateers any more?)

        Like

      • You are so clever with the candy bars. Does your son not know about the Tooth Fairy? Was he not motivated by something as basic as greed to save his teeth? What are you teaching this boy?

        Like

      • Maybe my mothering isn’t the best. I shove some coins under his pillow whether he has a tooth or not. This is usually after several nights of him reminding me he lost a tooth and several mornings of him wondering why the tooth fairy can’t figure out where we live. I never pay attention to what I give him. One morning it was an odd 81 cents. Hey man, I’m not trying to win any parenting awards here, I’m just trying to survive.

        Like

  2. Pingback: Crazy Things People Do to Invite The Tooth Fairy « The Jenny Evolution

    • It must be a terribly frightening thing for them, though, with good reason. It does sometimes hurt. Poor kiddos. My girl was brave thanks to the positive spin I put on it. Talking about getting coins from the Tooth Fairy always helps. πŸ™‚

      Like

  3. Pingback: Crazy Things People Do to Invite The Tooth Fairy

Share what you think of this story, or share one of your own!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s