Tag Archives: funny kid stories

The budding fashionista

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My children were watching a cartoon movie. It was one that they’d seen before. As such, I was rather confused when my four-year-old daughter quickly covered her eyes during one part. Usually once they’ve seen a movie for the first time, the scary parts aren’t so scary on subsequent viewings. But when I checked the screen, I saw that it wasn’t at all a scary scene.

“What’s the matter?” I asked my daughter.

“I just can’t watch this part,” she said.

“Why not?”

I could hardly believe her answer. Read the rest of this entry

A sticky situation. (And a tacky title.)

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At dinner one evening my sister noticed a small white glob adhered to her eight-year-old son’s cheek. She couldn’t understand how he got toothpaste on his face at dinner time.

“Wash that toothpaste off your face,” she told him.

“It’s not toothpaste,” he insisted.

“Then what the heck is it?” she asked. Read the rest of this entry

Speaking of that MBA child…

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When negotiations don’t work, there’s always this method…

It was time for me to start making dinner. My six-year-old asked what we were having. I told her sausage, potatoes, and corn or carrots. I even let her VOTE on corn or carrots. (She chose corn. Typical.) But then she decided she wasn’t a big fan of sausage and potatoes and asked if there were any other options. I did sort of feel like making tuna casserole since I had plenty of time for cooking, unlike some nights where sausage is the easy last-minute prep meal. So, I told her tuna was an option.

First she said, “Ohh, I don’t like that.”

I reminded her that she and her sisters always eat it up when I make it. Suddenly her eyes brightened as if remembering, so she wrapped her arms around my waist, squeezed me in a big hug, looked up at me with her beautiful green eyes, and said quietly but intensely, Read the rest of this entry

I predict an MBA in her future.

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Conversation between my husband and our six-year-old daughter:

“How can I have darker hair?”

“Well, some people dye it.”

“Can I dye my hair?”

“Maybe when you’re older.”

“Like seven or eight?”

“More like 18.”

“10?” Read the rest of this entry

I might as well have had boys!

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My daughters are into this vast series of fairy books where the bad guy is Jack Frost. My six-year-old drew me a picture of a few fairies (sounds girly enough, right?) and of Jack Frost. As she’s explaining the picture to me she said, “This fairy is holding a pile of Read the rest of this entry

You know I have good friends when…

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they’re willing to send me stories like this!

English: An used toilet paper roll Português: ...

English: An used toilet paper roll Português: Um rolo acabado de papel higiênico. (Photo credit: Wikipedia) There’s your Portugese lesson for the day. I just can’t get over why someone would take a picture of this. And why would wikipedia want it?

I was in the bathroom taking care of business while my two children milled around on the floor of the bathroom and my bedroom. Upon finishing, I came to the awful realization that not only was I left with an empty roll of TP, but there were no extra rolls in the bathroom either!

The only help I had were a nearly three-year-old and a 10-month-old.  Read the rest of this entry

Sometimes kids are too smart for their own good.

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mmmm doughnut ...

mmmm doughnut … (Photo credit: bunchofpants) What kind of a photo credit is that?!

 

When her grandparents were visiting, I tried to get my six-year-old to go to the grocery store with them. She wasn’t really interested, so I told her that they were going to buy donuts, which was true. Still not enticed, I suggested that, since the store was new to them, they would need her help finding the donuts.

 

Unswayed, she responded, Read the rest of this entry

More fun than watching paint dry

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My granddaughter stood unmoving for the longest time, staring into a corner.
“What are you doing?” I asked.
“Watching a Read the rest of this entry

Teaching the basics

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Richard Rabago

You must remember my students: Always use your balls.

The sensei asked his eager students, “What do we need to do when we kick?” The boys and girls, aged 6-9, repeated back the typical answers that Sensei has drilled into them: Focus your eyes, take small steps, kick as high as your stomach, and it’s not a race. Then one little boy in the back added confidently, “use your balls.” Sensei with a slight smile and a nod to the parents who were watching and listening  said, Read the rest of this entry